Skip directly to searchSkip directly to the site navigationSkip directly to the page's main content

Population Demographic Characteristics - Poverty Among Children Age 5-17

Summary Indicator Report Data View Options

In 2019, nearly 1 out of every 4 school-aged New Mexico children was living in poverty.

Percentage of Children Age 5-17 Living in Poverty by County, New Mexico, 2019

Percentage of Children Age 5-17 Living in Poverty by School District, New Mexico, 2019

Percentage of Children Age 5-17 Living in Poverty by 108 New Mexico Small Areas, 2015-2019

Percentage of Children Age 5-17 Living in Poverty by U.S. States and District of Columbia, 2019

Why Is This Important?

Research suggests that living in poverty during early childhood is associated with lower than average academic performance that begins in kindergarten(1) and extends through elementary and high school. Living in poverty during early childhood is associated with lower than average rates of school completion.(2)

Definition

The estimated percentage of children under age 5-17 living in households whose income is at or below the federal poverty level. Poverty status is determined by comparing household income to poverty thresholds (income cutoffs). Thresholds vary by family size and number of children under 18 in the household. For instance, the poverty level for a family of four in 2021 is $26,500. For more information, see [https://aspe.hhs.gov/poverty-guidelines].

Data Sources

How the Measure is Calculated

Numerator:Estimated number of children under age 5-17 living in households whose income is at or below the federal poverty level.
Denominator:The estimated number of children under age 5-17 in the population.

How Are We Doing?

In 2017, 89,200 children, or one out of every four New Mexico school-aged children, 5 to 17 years old, were in families living in poverty.

More Resources

(1) 2 Mulligan, G.M., Hastedt, S., and McCarroll, J.C. (2012). First-Time Kindergartners in 2010-11: First Findings From the Kindergarten Rounds of the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study, Kindergarten Class of 2010-11 (ECLS-K:2011) (NCES 2012-049). U.S. Department of Education. Washington, DC: National Center for Education Statistics. As cited in Children Living in Poverty(3). (2) Ross, T., Kena, G., Rathbun, A., KewalRamani, A., Zhang,J., Kristapovich, P., and Manning, E. (2012). Higher Education: Gaps in Access and Persistence Study (NCES 2012-046). U.S. Department of Education. Washington, DC: National Center for EducationStatistics. As cited in Children Living in Poverty(3). (3) The Condition of Education 2015, National Center for Education Statistics (NCES), U.S. Department of Education Institute of Education Sciences. Downloaded from https://nces.ed.gov/programs/coe/pdf/coe_cce.pdf on 7/9/15.

Indicator Data Last Updated On 06/25/2021, Published on 06/27/2021
Community Health Assessment Program, Epidemiology and Response Division, New Mexico Department of Health, 1190 S. Saint Francis Drive, P.O. Box 26110, Santa Fe, NM, 87502. Contact Rena Manning at rena.manning@state.nm.us