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New Mexico Cancer Incidence Query Query Measure Selection

Overview

The Cancer data in this IBIS-Q query module have been derived from the Surveilance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) Program and are maintained and provided by the New Mexico Tumor Registry (NMTR) at the University of New Mexico. The data were reported from New Mexico medical facilities including hospitals, clinics, physician offices, and pathology labs, as well as neighboring out-of-state facilities, and cover entire resident population of New Mexico. NMTR routinely reviews cancer mortality data to ensure complete coverage of cancer incidence within New Mexico.

Population Data

{{class BlueText 2019 population estimates are currently available in NM-IBIS.}}

Getting Started

Click on a blue bar to open and close selections to see a list of measures available.

  • Cancer Incidence CountsJump to Default
    Query Result
    Customize Your
    Query First
    Cancer Incidence - Count/Number of Cases
    Number of cancer cases in the selected population, geography, and time period.
    selectselect
  • Cancer Incidence - Crude RatesJump to Default
    Query Result
    Customize Your
    Query First
    Standard Query
    Number of cancer cases per 100,000 population. Table includes the crude incidence rate, upper and lower 95% confidence interval limits for the rate, number of incident cancer cases, and number in the population used to calculate the rate.
    selectselect
    5-Year Rolling Averages - Crude Incidence Rates (Overlapping 5-year Groups)
    Rolling averages are used to "smooth" trend lines that would otherwise be unstable. Often, the population size will be too small to yield a smooth trend line. By combining multiple years, the data will be more stable. "Rolling averages" are overlapping, aggregated year groups. They are overlapped so that more data points may be displayed, and also so the line shows changes more gradually.
    selectselect
  • Cancer Incidence - Age-adjusted RatesJump to Default
    Query Result
    Customize Your
    Query First
    Standard Query
    Number of cancer cases per 100,000 population, standardized to the age distribution of the U.S. 2000 population. Age-adjusted rates are useful for comparing geographies and population groups with different age distributions. The results table includes the age-adjusted incidence rate, upper and lower 95% confidence interval limits for the rate, number of incident cancer cases, and number in the population used to calculate the rate.
    selectselect
    5-Year Rolling Averages - Age-adjusted Incidence Rates (Overlapping 5-year Groups)
    Rolling averages are used to "smooth" trend lines that would otherwise be unstable. Often, the population size will be too small to yield a smooth trend line. By combining multiple years, the data will be more stable. "Rolling averages" are overlapping, aggregated year groups. They are overlapped so that more data points may be displayed, and also so the line shows changes more gradually.
    selectselect

  • Cancer Incidence by New Mexico Small AreasJump to Default
    Query Result
    Customize Your
    Query First
    Cancer Incidence - Count/Number of Cases
    Number of cancer cases in the selected population, geography, and time period.
    selectselect
    Cancer Incidence - Crude Rates
    Number of cancer cases per 100,000 population. Table includes the crude incidence rate, upper and lower 95% confidence interval limits for the rate, number of incident cancer cases, and number in the population used to calculate the rate.
    selectselect
    Cancer Incidence - Age-adjusted Rates
    Number of cancer cases per 100,000 population, standardized to the age distribution of the U.S. 2000 population. Age-adjusted rates are useful for comparing geographies and population groups with different age distributions. The results table includes the age-adjusted incidence rate, upper and lower 95% confidence interval limits for the rate, number of incident cancer cases, and number in the population used to calculate the rate.
    selectselect